Film Camera   1 comment

I got into photography as an all-digital guy. I’ve never had the space for a wet darkroom, and patience, at least when I was younger, was not my strong suit. When good DSLRs became more affordable, it seemed more do-able to me. I got a Nikon, along with my own “digital” darkroom.

Coincidentally, my late father had a Nikon. He mentioned wanting to get into photography from time to time, but probably had the same limitation. Unfortunately, he never got the opportunity to try out a DSLR to really explore the hobby. He did had a Nikon N80, which he did shoot family events with.

My mom came across it, and asked if I was interested in it. I thought it might be fun to go retro, and try some film shooting. All my lenses were compatible, so the only real expense is the film. Inside, there was a roll of film, half-shot. I finished it out, in part to test the camera.
N80

Film has a different look from digital, though part of it may be because of the film’s age. There are actually filters for Lightroom to emulate various types of film. The roll was Kodak Gold 200, which I don’t believe is made any more.

As always, my cats were eager ambivalent models.
Crouching Pico-Panther

As it turns out one hour film developing is no longer common–two to three days seems to be the norm, though I was told black and white would require more like two weeks. I found one place that still offered it to turn around this initial roll, and they said they would be discontinuing this service early next year.
Luna on her Blanket

My workflow was similar to my digital process. I had the film developed to a CD, and imported the images to Aperture. There, I made my final adjustments. Still, the distinctive look of film remained.
Beso in the Study

The roll of film was over eight years old–to some extent, I was surprised it came out at all. Some of the prints showed damage. I was able to fix some of it in Aperture, but artifacts remain. You can see signs in the doorframe, as well as just above Eddy’s eyes.
Eddy in a Corner

While I doubt I will shoot a lot of film–there is a bit of cost and hassle associated with it relative to digital–I think it will be fun to experiment with it from time to time.

As I mentioned, half of the roll was used by my father, and it was interesting to see what appeared. And, it would seem my dad and I got to shoot a roll of film together.

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One response to “Film Camera

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  1. I shoot periodic film for fun and to keep my eye in. Check out http://shop.lomography.com. They have alternative films and help hook you up with processing. That reminds me, I have a roll I need to send it. :)

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