Two More Blackbirds   5 comments

Yesterday, my daughter and I went to the National Museum of the United States Air Force. It was the first time we’d been there in a few years, and, as my daughter has gotten older, she grasps more. Quite a thing to see.

She was quite interested in some family history. I may have posted in the past that, in the ’70s, my dad was in the Air Force. His first job was flying the CH-3. They recently added the search-and-rescue version, the HH-3, to their collection. Its paint looks similar to what my dad was flying at the time.
HH-3

His job was the mid-air retrieval of drones. The one time I brought him to this museum, he pointed at this drone, Mr. Ling, and indicated that he recovered it on occasion.
Mr. Ling

I’ve always been a fan of the A-10 Warthog.
Caits and the Hog

As previously mentioned, my second favorite vehicle made of titanium is the Blackbird family. The most famous member is the SR-71.
Blackbird, Head-On

Blackbird Three-Quarters

Blackbird, Up-Top

We decided, on this occasion, to take the bus out to the Presidential and Research and Development hanger. Though it is in site of the museum, it is on Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. We attended the briefing, then the bus to the hanger. Two more members of the Blackbird family were there. The YF-12 is externally similar to the SR-71 and A-12, but designed as a high-speed interceptor. An unmanned, single-engine drone version was also built, known as the D-21, was produced.
YF-12 & D-21

In the ’60s, a test plane known as the X-15 flew faster and higher than any other winged craft until the Space Shuttle. One crossed the 100 Km mark, the internationally accepted boundary of space.
X-15A-2

The Presidential Collection includes any Air Force operated airplane that carried the president. One of the two iconic 707s used as Air Force One is on display. This is the one used by Kennedy, including his final trip to Dallas.
Boarding Air Force One

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Posted 2011-03-06 by Mr. Guilt in Aircraft, Ohio

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